ALPHABETICAL BRAIN™ VOCABULARY
QUOTATIONS ABOUT CONSCIOUSNESS
September 29, 2019


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BRAIN: THE COMPLETE MIND:
How it Develops, How it Works,
and How to Keep it Sharp


by Michael S. Sweeney with
forward by Richard Restak.
National Geographic, 2009 1st ed.
2014 (342 pages)

    [the 2014 paperback edition of the 2009
    hardback was reprinted for Barnes & Noble
    and sells for 1/4th the cost of the hardback
    edition, which was originally $40.00]
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QUOTATIONS ABOUT CONSCIOUSNESS

"Consciousness and unconsciousness often work in tandem with each other. But telling the difference between the two states --- consciousness and unconsciousness --- is essential to understanding the important roles they both play." (178)

"States of mind are defined by electrochemical processing of information along neural pathways. To understand the nuances of such processing, it is useful to explore two sets of distinctions." (178)

"PROCESSING DATA: The first is between automatic and controlled processing." (178)
[1] "Automatic processes arise primarily in the back, top, and side lobes of the brain." (178)

[2] "Controlled processes are located primarily in the region right behind the forehead." (178)
"REGISTERING INFORMATION: The second distinction separates cognition from emotion." (178)

"Cognition has been defined as: The ability of the central nervous system to attend, identify, and act on complex stimuli. Neurologist Richard Restak suggests an alternate, shorthand version: 'Cognition encompasses all the ways we know the world around us. It ranges from daydreaming to figuring partial differential equations.'" (178)

"Emotions affect cognition but are believed to be generated automatically at a level below consciousness. For example, emotions such as anger and fear arise from evolutionary programs that cause physical reactions to internal and external stimuli, since they are important for the survival of the species. But they tend to interfere with cognition until they subside." (178-179)

"During consciousness, three regions of the human brain constantly communicate among themselves. The prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum work together to analyze sensations and time-stamp them." (179)

"As these brain regions (prefrontal cortex, basal ganglia, and cerebellum) process the passage of time, they create images of the world in which causes produce events." (179)

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